Minnesota Medicare Part D is specifically for prescription drug coverage. It has something unique to it called the coverage gap. The coverage gap works similar to a deductible. Beneficiaries have to pay a certain amount determined by the coverage gap before they can get discounted prices. How large the discount, and what prescription drugs it applies to, is determined by the private insurance provider.

Before enrolling in a Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug plan, it’s a good idea to check that the formulary includes your prescription medications; the formulary is a list of prescription medications covered by the plan. Formularies vary by plan, and not every medication is covered by every Medicare plan, so it’s important to double check. Keep in mind that formularies are subject to change. The formulary may change at any time. You will receive notice from your plan when necessary.

During Open Enrollment, you may enroll your domestic partner, and your partner’s eligible dependents, in health and welfare benefits that are open for enrollment as long as the relationship meets established criteria. If you would like to enroll your newly-eligible domestic partner in Life and/or Accidental Death & Dismemberment (AD&D) insurance, or increase your own Life coverage, you will have a Period of Initial Enrollment from Jan. 1-31, 2019. See your benefits portal for details.


This measure, established under the Medicare Modernization Act (MMA), examines Medicare spending in the context of the federal budget. Each year, MMA requires the Medicare trustees to make a determination about whether general fund revenue is projected to exceed 45 percent of total program spending within a seven-year period. If the Medicare trustees make this determination in two consecutive years, a "funding warning" is issued. In response, the president must submit cost-saving legislation to Congress, which must consider this legislation on an expedited basis. This threshold was reached and a warning issued every year between 2006 and 2013 but it has not been reached since that time and is not expected to be reached in the 2016-2022 "window." This is a reflection of the reduced spending growth mandated by the ACA according to the Trustees.

In 2013-14, an estimated 88% of California youth ages 12-17 received a routine health check-up within the past 12 months, up from about 77% in 2001. However, about 7% of all California children—and 10% of lower-income children—had no usual source of health care in 2013-14. Estimates by race/ethnicity ranged from 5% (multiracial and white) to 11% (African American/black) with no usual source of care. Among children who did have a regular source of care, the majority (63%) used a doctor’s office or HMO, rather than hospitals, clinics, urgent care, emergency rooms, or other settings. For children living below 200% of the Federal Poverty Level, only 48% used a doctor’s office or HMO, compared to 77% for children from higher-income families.
Medicare Advantage plans, also referred to as Part C plans, are part of the Medicare program for senior citizens and disabled adults who qualify. Private companies provide Medicare Advantage plans instead of the federal government, and these plans typically include the same Part A hospital, Part B medical coverage and Part D drug coverage that Medicare does, with the exception of hospice care. As of 2017, about one third of the 57 million Medicare participants were enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan.
† Medicaid is a federal program providing health coverage to eligible low-income children and families; Medi-Cal is California's Medicaid program. CHIP (Children’s Health Insurance Program) is a federal program providing coverage to children/youth up to age 19 in families with incomes too high to qualify them for Medicaid, but too low to afford private coverage. California’s CHIP program was called the Healthy Families Program (HFP). Although California continues to receive CHIP funding, in 2013 HFP enrollees were transitioned into Medi-Cal.
The new healthcare law did not change the coverage you get from Medicare for major medical. You are still responsible for paying the remaining 20 percent of all hospital and doctor bills. Even a brief hospital stay can cost you thousands. That's why we maintain a complete catalog of Minnesota Medicare Supplement Insurance, also known as Medigap. We make it easy to find the best price on the plan you want. All Medigap plans are 100% compatible with the Medicare PartD pland listed above.
Two distinct premium support systems have recently been proposed in Congress to control the cost of Medicare. The House Republicans' 2012 budget would have abolished traditional Medicare and required the eligible population to purchase private insurance with a newly created premium support program. This plan would have cut the cost of Medicare by capping the value of the voucher and tying its growth to inflation, which is expected to be lower than rising health costs, saving roughly $155 billion over 10 years.[125] Paul Ryan, the plan's author, claimed that competition would drive down costs,[126] but the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) found that the plan would dramatically raise the cost of health care, with all of the additional costs falling on enrollees. The CBO found that under the plan, typical 65-year-olds would go from paying 35 percent of their health care costs to paying 68 percent by 2030.[127]
In 1977, the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) was established as a federal agency responsible for the administration of Medicare and Medicaid. This would be renamed to Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) in 2001. By 1983, the diagnosis-related group (DRG) replaced pay for service reimbursements to hospitals for Medicare patients.
This is only a summary of benefits describing the policies' most important features. The policy is the insurance contract. You must read the policy itself to understand all the rights and duties of both you and your insurance company. These policies may not fully cover all of your medical costs. Neither BCBSNC nor its agents are affiliated with Medicare. Plan A: BMS A, 12/17; Plan B: BMS B, 12/17; Plan C: BMS C, 12/17; Plan D: BMS D, 12/17; Plan F: BMS F, 12/17; Plan High-Ded F: BMS HDF, 12/17; Plan G: BMS G, 12/17; Plan K: BMS K, 12/17; Plan L: BMS L, 12/17; Plan M: BMS M, 12/17; Plan N: BMS N, 12/17. 
Complex rules control Part B benefits, and periodically issued advisories describe coverage criteria. On the national level these advisories are issued by CMS, and are known as National Coverage Determinations (NCD). Local Coverage Determinations (LCD) apply within the multi-state area managed by a specific regional Medicare Part B contractor, and Local Medical Review Policies (LMRP) were superseded by LCDs in 2003. Coverage information is also located in the CMS Internet-Only Manuals (IOM), the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), the Social Security Act, and the Federal Register.
Since 1997, Minnesota has provided Medicare coverage for approximately 35,000 Medicare-Medicaid eligible individuals over age 65 through the Minnesota Senior Health Options (MSHO) program. Today, the Minnesota demonstration recognizes this program stability and is focused on administrative flexibility rather than developing a new capitated system. The current demonstration will be evaluated for its ability to further promote integration. However, the longevity of the MSHO program provides for unique data analysis opportunities. MSHO claims data are a rich resource for researchers to analyze the impact of integrated care on health care outcomes for Medicare-Medicaid eligible.  To that end, the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) published Minnesota Managed Care Longitudinal Data Analysis which highlights the importance of providing integrated options for Medicare-Medicaid eligible individuals. It may be found at this link: https://aspe.hhs.gov/report/minnesota-managed-care-longitudinal-data-analysis
As of 2015, individuals who qualified for Medicare by virtue of their age alone made up 86 percent of Minnesota Medicare recipients. The balance — 14 percent — were on Medicare as the result of a disability. Kentucky had the highest percent of Medicare recipients listed as disabled (25 percent), followed by Alabama, Mississippi, West Virginia and Arkansas. Hawaii had the smallest percentage at 10 percent, followed by New Jersey, and North and South Dakota at 13 percent each.
If you are enrolled in a Medicare plan with Part D prescription drug coverage, you may be eligible for financial Extra Help to assist with the payment of your prescription drug premiums and drug purchases. To see if you qualify for Extra Help, call: 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227). TTY users should call 1-877-486-2048, 24 hours a day/ 7 days a week or consult www.medicare.gov; the Social Security Office at 1-800-772-1213 between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m., Monday through Friday. TTY users should call, 1-800-325-0778; or your state Medicaid Office.
Applicants have two primary options for completing applications. Any Social Security office can help applicants register for Medicare. It is most common for applicants to apply online. Applicants that are wondering how to apply for Medicare online will be happy to know that the process is not too difficult. On average, it only takes about 10 to 15 minutes to complete an online application. The Medicare application requires a few documents that applicants will want to have on hand. When filling out a MN Medicare enrollment application, enrollees will have to provide an official document that has their date and place of birth on it. The next piece of information that applicants will need concerns their past insurance. If they were on Medicaid they will need to list their state insurance number and the start and end dates of that particular coverage. Applicants that receive insurance from another source, such as from their spouse, will have to list this as well. If you missed your enrollment signup date and wish to be covered by affordable private insurance, call our toll-free number for a free quote.
Plans are insured through UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company or one of its affiliated companies, a Medicare Advantage organization with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in the plan depends on the plan’s contract renewal with Medicare. UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company pays royalty fees to AARP for use of its intellectual property. These fees are used for the general purposes of AARP. AARP and its affiliates are not insurers. You do not need to be an AARP member to enroll.
Special Election Period: Generally, once you enroll into a Medicare Advantage plan, you stay enrolled in the plan until the next Annual Election Period (AEP) opens. However, there are some life events that might qualify you for a Special Election Period (SEP) during other times of the year, so you can make a change to your Medicare Advantage coverage. Some examples of these life events include (but aren’t limited to):
The Minnesota Board on Aging (MBA) may be helpful for seniors seeking a wide range of information. The office provides education in a broad range of areas, including health-care coverage and Medicare plans. The office was first established in 1956. Since that time, seniors have been able to turn to the Minnesota Board of Aging for a variety of programs, including:

† Medicaid is a federal program providing health coverage to eligible low-income children and families; Medi-Cal is California's Medicaid program. CHIP (Children’s Health Insurance Program) is a federal program providing coverage to children/youth up to age 19 in families with incomes too high to qualify them for Medicaid, but too low to afford private coverage. California’s CHIP program was called the Healthy Families Program (HFP). Although California continues to receive CHIP funding, in 2013 HFP enrollees were transitioned into Medi-Cal.
The most significant change to the Medicare program, since its enactment in 1965, began on Jan. 1, 2006. Medicare now has a prescription drug benefit (Medicare Part D). In the fall of each year, all Minnesotans with Medicare receive information about the Medicare Part D program and the Annual Open Enrollment Period for Medicare Part D and Medicare Advantage plans. Agencies, organizations and people that work with Minnesotans with Medicare will want to be kept apprised of the latest Part D information and its effect on Minnesotans with Medicare.
There is some evidence that claims of Medigap's tendency to cause over-treatment may be exaggerated and that potential savings from restricting it might be smaller than expected.[158] Meanwhile, there are some concerns about the potential effects on enrollees. Individuals who face high charges with every episode of care have been shown to delay or forgo needed care, jeopardizing their health and possibly increasing their health care costs down the line.[159] Given their lack of medical training, most patients tend to have difficulty distinguishing between necessary and unnecessary treatments. The problem could be exaggerated among the Medicare population, which has low levels of health literacy.[full citation needed]
In general, all persons 65 years of age or older who have been legal residents of the United States for at least five years are eligible for Medicare. People with disabilities under 65 may also be eligible if they receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits. Specific medical conditions may also help people become eligible to enroll in Medicare.
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