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Your information and use of this site is governed by our updated Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. By entering your name and information above and clicking the Have an Agent Call Me button, you are consenting to receive calls or emails regarding your Medicare Advantage, Medicare Supplement Insurance, and Prescription Drug Plan options (at any phone number or email address you provide) from an eHealth representative or one of our licensed insurance agent business partners, and you agree such calls may use an automatic telephone dialing system or an artificial or prerecorded voice to deliver messages even if you are on a government do-not-call registry. This agreement is not a condition of enrollment.
One convenient way for children and youth to access needed services is through school-based health centers (SBHCs). These centers, whether located on school property or in the vicinity of a school, offer a range of services to underserved or uninsured students, such as primary medical care, mental or behavioral health care, dental care, substance abuse services, and health and nutrition education. More than 2,300 SBHCs operate nationwide (4). These centers have become a key part of the health care delivery system, as children and youth spend a significant amount of time at school, and barriers such as transportation and scheduling are reduced. SBHCs can lead to improved access to medical and dental care, health outcomes, and school performance (5, 6). They also reduce emergency room visits and health care costs (5, 6).
As with all HMOs—no matter whether a person is on Medicare or not—persons who enroll in a Medicare Advantage or other Part C HMO cannot use certain specialist physicians or out-of-network providers without prior authorization from the HMO, except in emergencies. In almost all Medicare Advantage plans—HMO or otherwise—the beneficiary must choose a primary care physician (PCP) to provide referrals and the beneficiary must confirm that the plan authorizes the visit to which the beneficiary was referred by the PCP. As with all HMOs, this can be a problem for people who want to use out-of -network specialists or who are hospitalized and are forced to use out-of-network doctors while hospitalized. Many Medicare Advantage PPO plans permit a subscriber to use any physician or hospital without prior authorization, but at a somewhat higher expense.
Retirement of the Baby Boom generation — which by 2030 is projected to increase enrollment to more than 80 million as the number of workers per enrollee declines from 3.7 to 2.4 — and rising overall health care costs in the nation pose substantial financial challenges to the program. Medicare spending is projected to increase from $523 billion in 2010 to just over $1 trillion by 2022.[20] Baby-boomers' health is also an important factor: 20% have five or more chronic conditions, which will add to the future cost of health care. In response to these financial challenges, Congress made substantial cuts to future payouts to providers as part of PPACA in 2010 and the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA) and policymakers have offered many additional competing proposals to reduce Medicare costs further.

It is extremely important to evaluate all options when making a decision about Medigap plans in Minnesota. In Minnesota, Medicare Supplement Insurance plans are available throughout the state as either a Medigap Basic plan or Medigap Extended Basic plan. However, the costs may be different based on which insurance carrier offers the plans. Those who wish to enroll in a Minnesota Medicare Supplement Insurance plan should thoroughly evaluate all available plans and make a determination based on personal health needs and budget.
*Out-of-network/non-contracted providers are under no obligation to treat Preferred Provider Organization (PPO) plan members, except in emergency situations. For a decision about whether we will cover an out-of-network service, we encourage you or your provider to ask us for a pre-service organization determination before you receive the service. Please call our customer service number or see your Evidence of Coverage for more information, including the cost-sharing that applies to out-of-network services.
"Health Care Choices for Minnesotans on Medicare 2013" (PDF) lists Medicare Part D prescription health plans and the coverage for each. Also includes general information on Medicare prescription coverage. It is published by the Minnesota Board on Aging and distributed by the Senior LinkAge Line, 1-800-333-2433. The Senior LinkAge Line representatives assist people of all ages in looking for lower-priced prescriptions.
The Democrats' plan means that after a life of hard work and sacrifice, seniors would no longer be able to depend on the benefits they were promised. By eliminating Medicare as a program for seniors, and outlawing the ability of Americans to enroll in private and employer-based plans, the Democratic plan would inevitably lead to the massive rationing of health care. Doctors and hospitals would be put out of business. Seniors would lose access to their favorite doctors. There would be long wait lines for appointments and procedures. Previously covered care would effectively be denied.
There can be many benefits to Medicare Advantage, also known as Medicare Part C. Perhaps you prefer the convenience of having all of your health and drug benefits under a single plan, instead of enrolling in a stand-alone Medicare Prescription Drug Plan for your Medicare Part D coverage. Or you may be looking for extra benefits that Original Medicare doesn’t cover, such as routine vision and dental coverage.
OptumRx is an affiliate of UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company. You are not required to use OptumRx home delivery for a 90-day supply of your maintenance medication. $0 copay may be restricted to particular tiers, preferred medications, or mail order prescriptions during the initial coverage phase and may not apply during the coverage gap or catastrophic stage.
Through 2016, these trigger points have never been reached and IPAB has not even been formed. However, in the 2016 Medicare Trustees Report, the actuaries estimate that the trigger points will be reached in 2016 or 2017 and that IPAB will affect Medicare spending for the first time in 2019 (meaning it will need to be formed and recommend its cuts in 2017).

Of the more than 300,000 people losing their Cost plans in Minnesota, it’s likely that roughly 100,000 people will be automatically enrolled into a comparable plan with their current insurer, Corson said, unless they make another selection. Details haven’t been finalized, he said. That likely will leave another 200,000 people, he said, who will need to be proactive to obtain new replacement Medicare coverage.


Medicare prescription drug coverage — called Medicare Part D — was the result of legislation passed in 2003 and signed into law by President George W. Bush in 2006. It is a bit of a controversial program because it was an unfunded liability — meaning that the vast majority of costs fell on taxpayers — and the law also barred Medicare from negotiating lower drug prices with drug makers. But by the end of its first decade, Medicare Part D was providing coverage for almost three quarters of all eligible Medicare beneficiaries, including those who have Part D coverage as part of their Medicare Advantage plan).

With the passage of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, Medicare beneficiaries were formally given the option to receive their Original Medicare benefits through capitated health insurance Part C plans, instead of through the Original fee for service Medicare payment system. Many had previously had that option via a series of demonstration projects that dated back to the early 1980s. These Part C plans were initially known as "Medicare+Choice". As of the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003, most "Medicare+Choice" plans were re-branded as "Medicare Advantage" (MA) plans (though MA is a government term and might not be visible to the Part C health plan beneficiary). Other plan types, such as 1876 Cost plans, are also available in limited areas of the country. Cost plans are not Medicare Advantage plans and are not capitated. Instead, beneficiaries keep their Original Medicare benefits while their sponsor administers their Part A and Part B benefits. The sponsor of a Part C plan could be an integrated health delivery system, a union, a religious organization, an insurance company or other type of organization.

The initial enrollment period is the best time for applicants to fill out their Medicare health insurance application to avoid late fees. Another time that applicants can register for Medicare is during the annual Minnesota Medicare enrollment period. The annual enrollment period begins at the same time each year. It officially starts on January 1 and goes until the very end of March. Certain enrollees might also have to pay a small late fee penalty for not enrolling during the MN initial enrollment period. Any applicants that enroll after this time will have to wait even longer for their coverage to begin, and they will have to pay an additional late penalty. Find out how you can obtain affordable private coverage and get a free health insurance quote by calling our toll-free number today.


Payment for physician services under Medicare has evolved since the program was created in 1965. Initially, Medicare compensated physicians based on the physician's charges, and allowed physicians to bill Medicare beneficiaries the amount in excess of Medicare's reimbursement. In 1975, annual increases in physician fees were limited by the Medicare Economic Index (MEI). The MEI was designed to measure changes in costs of physician's time and operating expenses, adjusted for changes in physician productivity. From 1984 to 1991, the yearly change in fees was determined by legislation. This was done because physician fees were rising faster than projected.
Of the 35,476 total active applicants who participated in The National Resident Matching Program in 2016, 75.6% (26,836) were able to find PGY-1 (R-1) matches. Out of the total active applicants, 51.27% (18,187) were graduates of conventional US medical schools; 93.8% (17,057) were able to find a match. In comparison, match rates were 80.3% of osteopathic graduates, 53.9% of US citizen international medical school graduates, and 50.5% of non-US citizen international medical schools graduates.[106]
Like other types of health insurance, each Medicare Advantage plan has different rules about coverage for treatment, patient responsibility, costs and more. Joining a Medicare Advantage plan may make someone ineligible to continue receiving health care coverage through their employer or union, so if employer-based coverage fits a consumer's needs, they may want to hold off on enrolling in Medicare.
Most people fill Medicare’s coverage gaps by buying a Medicare supplement (medigap) plan and a Part D prescription-drug plan, or they get both medical and drug coverage from a private insurer with a Medicare Advantage plan. You have from October 15 to December 7 each year to pick a Medicare Part D prescription-drug plan or a Medicare Advantage plan for the year ahead. You can switch from one Part D plan to another, or from one Medicare Advantage plan to another. You can also switch into a Medicare Advantage plan. However, if you have Medicare Advantage and want to switch to a medigap plan plus a Part D plan, you may have limited medigap options depending on your health—although you can choose any Part D plan during open enrollment. (For more information about how to choose between Medicare Advantage or medigap and Part D, see How to Fill Medicare Coverage Gaps).
Private managed care programs for Medicare beneficiaries are particularly popular in Minnesota. More than half of all Minnesota Medicare enrollees are in Medicare Advantage plans, as opposed to a national average of 33 percent (in Minnesota, it’s 56 percent; Hawaii has the second-highest percentage of their Medicare beneficiaries covered by Medicare Advantage, at 45 percent).
But the costs per person that had once been too low to attract beneficiaries then became too high to afford long term. So in 2009, the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC) reported that Medicare would spend 14 percent more on Medicare Advantage beneficiaries per person that year than they did per person for "like beneficiaries" under traditional Medicare, theoretically adding an additional 3% ($14 billion) to the cost of the overall Medicare program compared to spending without Part C,[5] This lack of parity and disconnect with the original goal of Part C was primarily caused by so-called Private Fee for Service (PFFS) plans (designed primarily for the rural and urban poor), special needs plans (SNPs), and Employer Group plans (which primarily served retired union members). A special situation relative to Puerto Rico contributed to the imbalance at that time. However the lack of parity also applied to a lesser degree to HMO and PPO plans nationwide.
There can be many benefits to Medicare Advantage, also known as Medicare Part C. Perhaps you prefer the convenience of having all of your health and drug benefits under a single plan, instead of enrolling in a stand-alone Medicare Prescription Drug Plan for your Medicare Part D coverage. Or you may be looking for extra benefits that Original Medicare doesn’t cover, such as routine vision and dental coverage.
A Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plan (PDP) can help pay your prescription drug costs. Designed to work alongside Original Medicare coverage, Medicare Prescription Drug Plans are available from private insurance companies approved by Medicare and doing business in Minnesota. You can also enroll in a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan if you enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan that does not include Part D prescription drug coverage in its benefits.
Lifestyle: Medicare Advantage plans often only operate with a certain region. If you’re a snowbird living in more than one state throughout the year, traditional Medicare plus Medigap is probably a better choice than an Advantage plan. This may also be true if you travel frequently: Some Medigap plans provide coverage when traveling outside of the United States and cover you in all 50 states; Advantage plans generally do not. 
Major provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) were implemented in January 2014. With the implementation of the ACA, many of the participants in Healthy San Francisco became newly eligible for insurance through Medi-Cal Expansion starting January 2014, resulting in an 83 percent caseload increase within two years. The Human Services Agency (HSA) aims to further increase enrollment through outreach to the estimated 10,000 low-income San Franciscans who do not have health insurance.

In general, all persons 65 years of age or older who have been legal residents of the United States for at least five years are eligible for Medicare. People with disabilities under 65 may also be eligible if they receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits. Specific medical conditions may also help people become eligible to enroll in Medicare.
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