Medicare Advantage offers health benefits for Medicare beneficiaries through private plans instead of through Original — or traditional — Medicare (the federal government’s fee-for-service program). These plans are one option for consumers who desire additional benefits beyond what Original Medicare offers, but are not considered a wise option by some consumers who are concerned that government spends more per enrollee on the private plans than it does on Original Medicare. Medicare Advantage plans are available with no premium other than the cost of Part B, but they also have provider networks that are more limited than Original Medicare, and total out-of-pocket costs can be considerably higher than enrollees would pay if they had Original Medicare plus a Part D plan plus Medigap.
Tufts Health Plan Senior Care Options is available to individuals who are at least 65 years old and have Medicare and MassHealth Standard (Medicaid) or just MassHealth Standard (Medicaid). This plan provides members who qualify with medical and prescription benefits along with a Primary Care Team, whose key goal is to improve the coordination of care you receive. 
Out-of-network/non-contracted providers are under no obligation to treat Blue Cross NC members, except in emergency situations. For a decision about whether we will cover an out-of-network service, we encourage you or your provider to ask us for a pre-service organization determination before you receive the service. Please call our customer service number or see your Evidence of Coverage for more information, including the cost-sharing that applies to out-of-network services.
In total spending on Medicare, Minnesota ranked #25 in 2009, with $6.9 billion per year. With the largest and smallest numbers of recipients, itʼs no surprise that California accounted for $50.6 billion of overall Medicare spending, while Medicare spent only $553 million in Alaska. Total Medicare spending for all states and the District of Columbia was $471 billion in 2009 (latest available data).
With the passage of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, Medicare beneficiaries were formally given the option to receive their Original Medicare benefits through capitated health insurance Part C plans, instead of through the Original fee for service Medicare payment system. Many had previously had that option via a series of demonstration projects that dated back to the early 1980s. These Part C plans were initially known as "Medicare+Choice". As of the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003, most "Medicare+Choice" plans were re-branded as "Medicare Advantage" (MA) plans (though MA is a government term and might not be visible to the Part C health plan beneficiary). Other plan types, such as 1876 Cost plans, are also available in limited areas of the country. Cost plans are not Medicare Advantage plans and are not capitated. Instead, beneficiaries keep their Original Medicare benefits while their sponsor administers their Part A and Part B benefits. The sponsor of a Part C plan could be an integrated health delivery system, a union, a religious organization, an insurance company or other type of organization.
Under the Medicare Advantage Promoting Interoperability Program, payments are made only to Medicare Advantage organizations that are licensed as HMOs, or in the same manner as HMOs, by a state. These Medicare Advantage organizations may receive incentive payments by way of Medicare Advantage eligible professionals (EPs) and Medicare Advantage hospitals (MA-affiliated hospitals).
If choose not to enroll in Medicare Part B and then decide to do so later, your coverage may be delayed and you may have to pay a higher monthly premium for as long as you have Part B. Your monthly premium will go up 10 percent for each 12-month period you were eligible for Part B, but didn’t sign up for it, unless you qualify for a "Special Enrollment Period."
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